Tomorrow’s Kingdom

If you haven’t read the Gypsy King read that first.

Maureen Fergus hooked me with the first two installments of the trilogy so I was excited to dive into the final book. Like the other books in the series, Tomorrow’s Kingdom is an exciting fantasy adventure.

The idea of a lost royal child having a unique perspective towards peasants, servants, and outcast tribes that will unite the kingdom is a bit cliche, but I must admit I enjoy it. There’s modern sensibilities towards prejudice and class divide injected into a setting of castles, corsets, horses, and adventure.

The romance is steamy but not explicit. The war has action but is not gruesome. These factors make the book appropriate for teens although I think many adults would enjoy it as well.

The villains are despicable men who are greedy, misogynistic and violent but they are also believable. They have reasons to be the disgusting people they are, formed by both nature and nurture they are well rounded characters.

This is a series I would recommend to readers looking for historical adventure, strong female characters or medieval fantasy. The fantasy elements do not play a large role, so it would appeal to people primarily interested in adventure who don’t mind a touch of legend or a sprinkle of magic in a story.

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Don’t Fear The Reaper

cover art of once dead, twice shyYes that’s an awesome song by Blue Oyster cult, and the song is actually mentioned in the amazing book Once Dead, Twice Shy by Kim Harrison. I was having mixed feelings about running Angel Month for Teen Tuesdays after I read Hush, Hush but Harrison’s novel has me enthused again.

Free will vs. Fate is the big debate this book will spark, and I love a good debate or any book that makes you think about big picture concepts.

What I found most interesting about Once Dead, Twice Shy is the angel mythology that is either new or different from what I am familiar with. That reapers are a kind of angels, and there are different classes of angels within the dark and the light is fascinating stuff.

I love that the dark and the light are not completely clear. With the “dark” angel having white wings and the “light” reaper having grey wings, the ambiguity of their place in the universe as good or bad is seen on a literal level. There is no pure evil and pure good that you might expect in such a story, and both free will and fate make some good arguments.

Everything I felt was lacking in Hush, Hush I found here.

  • Angel mythology
  • A character I liked and related to
  • Male characters who weren’t pigs, masculine minus the stalker/violent syndrome
  • Personality over power (cool powers but they don’t overpower the story)

I will definitely be looking for more by Kim Harrison!